enitru

Exhibitions in 2014

Annunciazione di Sarzana

Andrea del Sarto (Firenze 1486-1530), Annunciation, 1528, Oil on panel, Florence, Palatine Gallery

The Pure, Simple and Natural in Art in Florence Between the 16-17th centuries

June 17 – November 2, 2014

Artists and art in search of a definition: this could be one reading of the great exhibition The Pure, Simple and Natural in Art in Florence between the 16th and 17th centuries, which is the second exhibition to open in 2014 at the Uffizi Gallery.

The “modern manner” of Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael was exalted by Giorgio Vasari for having overcome the tradition of the 15th century and having reached “perfection. With minor conviction, he also cited Fra ‘Bartolomeo and Andrea del Sarto as of importance, as fine drawers who could imitate nature and creators of devotional works.

In that period – between the end of the 16th century and the turn of the new – Florence and Italy was seeing the opening of several paths of change in various fields, not just art: in music, language, religion and, above all, in the sciences, that were promoting profound changes. The period in art, however, is missing a name or categorization that art historians usually tend to assign to historical periods to group together artistic tendencies, no matter how complex they might be.

Between Romanticism, Gothic and Late Gothic and Renaissance and Mannerism and  Caravaggism and Baroque, where to place this group of Florentine artists? The Uffizi has grouped them by their style of pure, simple, natural, expressions of honest principles but which can be a formal title?

The exhibit is divided into 5 chronological periods and then 4 thematic sections (72 paintings and sculptures in all) which presents a whole series of masterpieces, many of which have been restored just for the occasion.

There are works by the masters: Andrea della Robbia and Andrea del Sarto, Fra’ Bartolomeo and Andrea Sansovino and then of their “students” from the modern “ordered manner”: Franciabigio, Bugiardini, Sogliani.

Annunciazione

Santi di Tito (Borgo San Sepolcro 1536-Florence 1603), Annunciation, 1575 circa,
Oil on wood, Scrofiano (Sinalunga), Oratory of Compagnia del Santissimo Salvatore

Then there is Bronzino and Alessandro Allori, Santi di Tito, Jacopo da Empoli, Ottavio Vannini (for the first time in Florence, his masterpiece conserved at the Nantes Musée des Beaux-Arts) and Lorenzo Lippi.

Ritratto di Jacopo Cennini fattore mediceo

Franciabigio (Francesco di Cristofano; Florence 1484-1525), Portrait of Jacopo Cennini, Steward for Pierfrancesco de’ Medici, 1523, Oil on wood, On loan from Her Royal Highness Queen Elizabeth II

After a hall dedicated to drawings from real life, where there are samples from Andrea del Sarto to Pontormo from the mid 16th century, the same artists are reproposed by themes: “paintings of home”, of private items (which includes a beautiful work by Fra’ Bartolomeo coming from the Los Angeles County Museum), “paintings of things”, where the protagonists are domestic objects (note the magnificent  Franciabigio coming from the English Royal Collections) and of the “scared tradition”, which closes the show with a spectacular triptych of the Redemptor by Torrigiani (rediscovered in Great Britain), Caccini (a miraculous conservative recovery) and of Novelli (from the New York Metropolitan).

Enjoy your visit!

Past Exhibitions

Francesco Noletti, known as Il Maltese Still-life with Carpet, Candied Fruit, Flowers and a Basket of Fruit - c. 1650 oil on canvas

Francesco Noletti, known as Il Maltese
Still-life with Carpet, Candied Fruit, Flowers and a Basket of Fruit, c. 1650 oil on canvas

The Room of the Muses
Baroque paintings from the Francesco Molinari Collection

February 11 – May 11, 2014

The Molinari Pradelli private collection is internationally renown and the most important formed in Bologna in the 20th century. The famed orchestra conductor Francesco Molinari Pradelli (1911-1996) traveled all over the world during his professional career and loved collecting high quality works of art.

turchi-orbetto

Alessandro Turchi, known as L’Orbetto
Rape of Europa, c. 1620–30 oil on canvas

With over 100 paintings from the collection, the Uffizi Gallery pays homage to a prestigious conductor who worked in Florence at the helm of the Maggio Musicale Fiorentino and at the Teatro Comunale. The conductor had success all over the world, in Europe and America, from Vienna to San Francisco to New York’s Metropolitan Opera.
His growing passion for collecting paintings started in the 1950s, first with 19th century works and then discovering Baroque painting. He developed an attraction for still-lifes, a genre just beginning to garner interested from scholars.

In this, the maestro

combined the pleasure of owning artwork, aesthetic appreciation and the desire for knowledge, stimulated by museum visits in the cities his professional career took him to.

His choice of art reflected his passion, not what others considered might have considered was important to own.

carlo-magini

Carlo Magini, Still-life with Vegetables, Bread, Calf’s Head and Kitchen Utensils
c. 1760–1800, oil on canvas

Great art historians from Europe and America came to admire the maestro’s large private collection of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century painting from various Italian schools and the particular attention for models.

Mario Nuzzi, known as Mario dei Fiori - Bunch of Flowers in a Historiated Vase c. 1650–60, oil on canvas

Mario Nuzzi, known as Mario dei Fiori
Bunch of Flowers in a Historiated Vase
c. 1650–60, oil on canvas

The selection of over 100 paintings you can admire at the Uffizi is an exceptional opportunity to admire paintings not usually admired by the general public.

Opening hours

Tuesday – Sunday   8.15am – 6.50pm;
Closed on Mondays and 1st May
Exhibition included in Uffizi Gallery entry ticket.

The “modern manner” of Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael was exalted by Giorgio Vasari for having overcome the tradition of the 15th century and having reached “perfection.